Court Rejects Asbestos Laundry Case (PA)

Earlier this month, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania denied a wrongful death claim in Haldman v. Eaton Corporation that alleged a women developed terminal cancer as a result of her exposure to asbestos while doing laundry. The suit was brought by Daniel Haldaman, the executor of the estate of his wife, Gerda Haldaman.

Evidence suggested that Gerda’s husband, Ray Haldaman, may have been exposed to asbestos dust in the Pennsylvania steel mill where he worked. In fact, the appeals court concluded that in general, asbestos containing products were present in theRay Haldaman’s workplace during the time of his employment. Daniel Haldaman sued the manufacturers of the asbestos-containing brakes that were present in the mill and further alleged that Gerda routinely washed her husband’s clothes, which were “dirty and covered in dust.”

However, the appeals court determined there was no evidence of specific exposure to any of the asbestos-containing products. According to the court, “those statements identifying particular products and times did not mention the presence of Ray Haldaman, and specific references to Ray Haldaman did not place him in the proximity of specific asbestos containing products at specific times.” In sum, there was no nexus between Ray—and by extension Gerda Haldaman—and the asbestos-containing products manufactured by the defendants.

The court concluded that Daniel had only established the potential for exposure, but did not conclusively prove asbestos exposure from a specific source. As a result, the appeals panel upheld the grant of summary judgment for product defendants. The case provides interesting insight into what future plaintiffs need to establish in the increasing number of asbestos cases.

Thanks to Erica Woebse for her contribution to this post. If you have any questions, please email Paul at pclark@wcmlaw.com.